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Turning a blind eye: when people remain silent to abuse in the name of religion, tradition, and culture

The thought that people in the 21st Century are silent about abuse appears to be an absurd notion. There has been a significant development in how public opinion is increasing the awareness of the role of abuses that occur behind closed doors, and the responsibility of safeguarding to protect the most vulnerable. Case studies of Daniel Pelka, Baby P, and even the institutional abuses at Winterbourne View Hospital are significant signal crimes, having provided public opinion with the chance to progress its understanding of abuse behind closed doors, being able to question concerning behaviours and beliefs, and for this to be reflected within legislation; with abusers even being sentenced and imprisoned.

Abuses behind closed doors

I raise the progression made on abuses that occur behind closed doors; there is still far to go, however, institutional abuses that occur literally in front of these doors are still an issue in society today.

The power imbalance of the state and police department in recognising their responsibility for the murder of George Floyd is one of many examples of this; the image of the local authority leaning on his neck, with him pleading for his mother and his life, is an image that can never be forgotten. The issues of institutional racism can be traced back decades, with the MacPherson Report highlighting these issues following the murder of Stephen Lawrence in 1993, but how far has society come to know about crimes committed within the family and community, to preserve the honour of religion, culture, and tradition? Deciding to leave one’s religious faith, has the potential to cause disruptions to the ideological framework of the family and community.

This decision appears to increase the level of threat the family and community may feel towards the individual as a result, with an increased likelihood of creating an environment of abuse to foster physical and psychological abuse. Being able to challenge such abuse, which occurs under the veil of religion, tradition, and culture, appears to be difficult. This might be due to how this type of abuse is maintained under collusion and coercive control within the family and community – with maintaining izzat (honour) being deemed the highest priority, instead of maintaining the dignity of the human being. His article aims to reflect upon the notion that apostatic-abuse occurs both in private and public worldwide due to the influences of power involved with this issue.

The definition of “apostate”

An apostate is a term used to describe people who once identified as religious, or with faith, or belief in God, or gods, and now identifies as non-religious. The transition of apostasy is difficult for the individual for a number of reasons, and the example of the Lion King is usually apt in explaining this issue (spoilers follow):

The moment where Mufasa dies, Simba (Mufasa’s son) is blamed for this and is shunned to leave the family home by his uncle Scar, and Scar further directs his hyena-followers to kill Simba. Simba evades the attack and travels across the desert alone and isolated for a considerable amount of time, where he eventually collapses.

The journey of Simba during this moment is similar to the journey of the apostate. The thought that a person can have a different opinion to that of the household can be divisive. For example, public opinion was ideologically divided in the United Kingdom over the recent decision to either remain in or leave the European Union. Having ideological differences on this topic, ruptured the cohesion within society, where family members even stopped talking to each other based on the ideological decision made. These political and ideological differences were used as a rationale by the murderer who sided with leaving the European Union, of Labour MP Jo Cox who sided with remaining in the European Union.

Apostates and their families

Sadly, the act of apostasy, where family members have ideological differences, can cause a similar threat reaction by families and communities towards their family member. When family members are strongly dedicated to the conviction of their ideology, faith, and/or scripture, the assertion of shunning the individual, using violence, and even threatening and causing death can be viable options to maintain the honour of their family home and community, is saddening. This conviction further facilitates an abusive environment to develop within the family and community, with family members silently accepting the abuse as a consequence for holding ideological differences. The reaction of the family members increases the likelihood of the person being isolated and shunned, which further creates an environment suitable for abuse to occur, and in similarity to Simba’s journey, this increases the likelihood of the apostate being left to survive on their own without support from the family that once supported them. The differences in thought and ideology create the dynamic of the family belonging to the in-group, and the apostate being identified in the out-group. This also appears to dehumanise the apostate, labelling them as a traitor to the values held dear by the family and community, thus perceiving abuse as an appropriate and acceptable punishment. The power held against the individual by the family and community increases the likelihood of secrecy and silence towards the harm that may be caused.

Abuses against apostates

The concern currently relates to how society appears to struggle with challenging ideas and beliefs, with origins based in religion, tradition, and culture. Regardless of its origin, however, abuse cannot be tolerated. Abuse is usually about a structural and personal power imbalance. The abuser uses that power as leverage to get the individual to do things, they do not want to do. One can appreciate that abuse of any kind, such as physical, psychological, neglect, and domestic violence, are all means to impede on the life of an individual. The cause for concern grows immensely when family members engage in acts of abuse against their own, and in cases within familial communities where the notion of abuse is hidden. Case studies from the past, such as Victoria Climbie, Shafilea Ahmed, and Surjit and Sarbjit Athwal, provide a rare insight into the damaging consequences of abuse within the family home. Some of the conditions that are similar between these case studies are that families maintained secrecy and a sense of order within the home to ensure the abuse remained hidden. The interesting similarity in these cases is how religion, culture, and/or tradition are used to rationalise the abuse – to maintain the notion of izzat; honour, within the family and community. This consequently creates an environment where the notion of honour is prioritised higher than the notion of humanity. Indeed, abuse cannot be tolerated, and for society to not tolerate such abuse, society needs to become comfortable with Maajid Nawaz’s notion that, “no idea is above scrutiny, and no person is below dignity”. What this means is that we can only challenge this type of abuse by becoming more comfortable with calling-out concerning behaviours and beliefs, regardless of their origin, and by adhering to the view of maintaining the dignity of humanity at all costs. Through this perspective, we can limit the number of vulnerable people that may be victims of such abuse, by not being silent to the abuses occurring behind closed doors.

Two key findings of the study

My recent publication, Apostates as a Hidden Population of Abuse Victims (Parekh & Egan, 2020), was the first research study to identify the worldwide abuses that apostates face within religious households. Two significant issues were found whilst completing the research.

Differences between ex-Muslims and ex-Christians

First, Muslim apostates were more likely than Christian apostates to face abuses in the form of assault (being shoved, pushed), serious assault (being hit, physically hurt, threats of death or injury), and psychological abuse (coercive control, stress, fear). The offenders in cases of apostatic-abuse are usually family members and members of their local community, who are acting under the guise of protecting, preserving and honouring their religion, tradition, and culture. Despite the lower number of people identifying as Muslim apostates in the study, they were significantly more likely to face this level of abuse, which questions the volatility towards apostates within some Muslim households across the world, and raises the wider question of how apostates may be perceived within Islam. The religious scriptures within Islam do not favour the apostate well, how else would a marginalised group cope with people who defect? Sadly, this has been integrated within the legislature of twelve nation-states, where the act of apostasy is still punishable by death, and in seven states where this act is punishable with a prison sentence (Humanists International, 2019; Humanists International, 2020). This shows a link between the way in which the religious scriptures are interpreted, actualised, and how religious sanctions are integrated within the criminal justice systems too. The power held by the state to kill its citizens is a concerning criminological issue; one that I would assert the state should not have, however, what appears to also be concerning is that the notion of human intrigue, inquisition, and intuition, are punishable. How can human beings flourish, if the very nature of being human is open to punishment? The recent case of Mubarak Bala in Nigeria is a testament to the concerns of this study. Enacting blasphemy laws appears to be positively supported as a way of preserving religious, traditional, and cultural values and practices, and by doing so, are perceived as favourable within the religious community. Bala’s post which critiqued Islam on social media was interpreted as insulting to Islam within Nigeria. As such, the full force of the religiously informed criminal justice system has been unhinged in its approach to deny Bala of his basic human rights. But, the power held by such traditionalistic interpretations of Islam, raises considerable concerns for people within a nation-state that may think differently. Cultural rules and values, under the guise of “honour,” are systematically embedded by families and communities to prevent individualisation and the demise of traditional cultural norms held by the parental migrant generation, which causes people to live fearfully within an Orwellian dystopia, enforced by the Sword of Damocles.

Apostates are less likely to report abuse to the police

Second, victims were less likely to inform the local authority of the abuses they were facing. Does this beg the question as to why victims are not reporting their abuse to the police? There are several reasons why victims struggle to report their abuse,  and a selection of the reasons are highlighted here. Firstly, does the police truly understand the extent of apostatic-abuse? Secondly, will the police understand the religious, cultural, and traditional significance of this act of abuse? Thirdly, what are the ramifications for the victim within their family and community if they disclose this abuse, and will this cause further retribution? Fourthly, if the victim is under the age of adulthood, will the police take their claim seriously? Fifthly, does the religious community have a sense of power and influence within society that, can be used against the apostate? Sixthly, if the victim is to report the abuse, will they be shunned from the family? Seventhly, can the victim report the abuse, if by identifying as an apostate, they are likely to be punished instead? The study was able to capture the voices of the victims, and the reasons why they struggled to inform the local authority. What becomes concerning is that, despite being abused, victims are still left powerless. The psychological impact of having one’s family member taking part in abuse for having a difference of perspective is open to severely damaging the victim’s perspective of how the world functions, and if law enforcement remains silent too, then this further increases the levels of helplessness felt by the victim. When victims are left in a state of helplessness, this questions the legitimacy of the state in being able to protect its citizens from harm. The rationale of religion, culture, and tradition appear to be sufficient in extending punishment onto the apostate, and for family members, the community, and even police forces to further their assertion that the apostate might deserve the punishment they receive. How dangerous is it then, for a religious person to question deeply held religious views? This is a pertinent issue that fails to be raised – an apostate was once religious. Hence, if a religious person begins to doubt the teachings of their faith, and this is deemed as insulting, then how do religious people remain safe under such draconian infrastructure? If a religious person starts questioning their faith, and this becomes the catalyst for abuse within the home due to notions of dishonour, then how likely is that religious person to continue questioning their beliefs, or raise alarm to the way they are being treated; especially if they are aware that the local authority is less likely to support them? The responsibility for reporting the abuse should not be solely on the shoulders of the abused. The poignant issue here is to highlight the social structures that are involved to inhibit the victim from being aware that they have the power to report the crimes being committed against them.

How to contrast apostatic-abuse?

So, what do we do when dark things and hidden wrongdoings are concealed by social norms? Apostatic-abuse, by its nature, is usually hidden due to the stigma of dishonouring the family and the community, with members maintaining social norms to protect the moral fibre of its community. The consequences of which, can be truly abhorrent for the apostate, where they might have experienced physical and psychological abuse, to being shunned, excommunicated, to even having their life threatened by people who they believed loved them. When abuse can proliferate under secrecy, this increases the difficulties for local authorities to become aware that such victims exist. The example of how activists in the United Kingdom have worked with local authorities to raise awareness of the damaging effects of forced marriage and female genital mutilation to victims and asserting the need to criminalise abusers is a positive step towards legitimising the effect of these crimes towards victims (Council of Europe, 2017; Raptim, 2018). Following a similar model, internationally, would be advocated towards challenging and supporting victims of apostatic-abuse (Metropolitan Police, 2020; NPCC, 2018; Safe Lives, 2017). This model would act as a catalyst to provide training to organisations within criminal justice systems to support their comprehension of this hidden form of abuse. This may also facilitate conversations with members of parliament to further increase support for this abuse being represented within the legislation. This is not an issue within an isolated geographical location, but a worldwide phenomenon. As such, recognition of this form of abuse for organisations that work to support victims would be influential in gaining insight into the effects apostatic-abuse can cause. This form of action, awareness, and support being provided by agencies of criminal justice systems, may reduce the influence of power that abusers may have on victims, as a result of this crime becoming recognised.

Apostatic-abuse is a crime that is maintained through secrecy, social collusion, and coercive control, to maintain power and control over the individual that decides to think differently from their family and community. Sadly, in some nation-states, this perspective has also been criminalised with legislation even advocating for the death of the individual or imprisonment. This remains a crime that is either hidden within families and communities or is carried out by the state, through blasphemy laws, as a form of appeasing the masses to show the integration of religious law to criminal law. When human beings are restricted to how they can think about issues that are pertinent to them, increases the feelings of closure, censure, and control that are not psychologically healthy for the individual. This article, along with the published research, are the first steps to highlight these issues and starting the conversation of how we can help hidden victims around the world.

References

Council of Europe. (2017). Female Genital Mutilation and Forced Marriage. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://rm.coe.int/female-genital-mutilation-and-forced-marriage/16807baf8f.

Humanists International. (2019). The Freedom of Thought Report. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://fot.humanists.international/download-the-report/.

Humanists International. (2020). Humanists at Risk: Action Report 2020. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://humanists.international/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/3098_Humanists-International_Humanists-at-Risk-Action-Report_Amends-V2_LR.pdf.

Parekh, H., & Egan, V. (2020). Apostates as a hidden population of abuse victims. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, DOI: 10.1177/0886260519898428.

Metropolitan Police. (2020). Operation Limelight. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/860625/operation_limelight_instructions.pdf.

National Police Chief’s Council (NPCC). (2018). Honour Based Abuse, Forced Marriage and Female Genital Mutilation: a Policing Strategy for England, Wales & Northern Ireland – Eradicating Honour based Abuse, Force Marriage and Female Genital Mutilation Together. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://www.npcc.police.uk/Publication/Final%20NPCC%20HBA%20strategy%202015%202018December%202015.pdf

Raptim. (2018). 12 NGOs Fighting Against Female Genital Mutilation. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://www.raptim.org/fighting-against-female-genital-mutilation/.

Safe Lives (2017). Your Choice: ‘honour’-based violence, forced marriage and domestic abuse. Accessed on 1st August 2020: https://safelives.org.uk/sites/default/files/resources/Spotlight%20on%20HBV%20and%20forced%20marriage-web.pdf.

“My Favourite Things”: Flower Violet (Stephanie Nixon)

My favourite TV show - Don't really watch much TV, though I do love David Attenborough and his nature documentaries ❤ I also love the South Park series! 
 
My favourite place to go - Ulm; Southern Germany. My partner got a job working in Germany, so I visited him in July 2019. Ulm is a very homely, colourful and picturesque place, home to the Ulmer Münster (world's tallest church) and a beautiful Danube! 



My favourite city - Birmingham! My beautiful, vibrant home city!

My favourite thing to do in my free time - I love writing! I'm currently working on my second Everyday Miracles Book, I have a blog and I write in a daily journal, and monthly reflection 🙂 I also love walking, weightlifting and doing charity work and supporting campaigns

My favourite athlete/sports personality -Tatsuo Suzuki; an 8th Dan Wado-Ryu martial artist, who helped spread Wado-Ryu throughout Europe and the world

My favourite actor – I love Signourney Weaver and Saoirse Ronan

My favourite author - Lorna Byrne

My favourite drink - Latte - always love a latte ❤

My favourite food - Roast Duck

My favourite place to eat - I have 2 favourite places; one is Blue Ocean, which is Singaporean and Malaysian food, and the other is Bombay Brasserie, which does British and Indian food

I like people who - are compassionate, caring, open-minded, loving and respectful

I don’t like it when people - are rude, disrespectful, arrogant, prejudiced and wilfully ignorant

My favourite book - I've read many amazing books… my favorite at this point has to be The Dawkins Delusion by Alister McGrath, and all of the Lorna Byrne books; ❤

My favourite book character - Not too sure… I've read lots of books…

My favourite film - I don't really have a favourite film… I do love The Passion of the Christ though.

My favourite poem - "First they came for…" by Martin Niemoeller

My favourite artist/band - Tangerine Dream!!!

My favourite song - Too Hot for My Chinchilla, by Tangerine Dream. This song always makes me so happy

My favourite art - Star of Bethlehem by Sir Edward Burne-Jones

My favourite person from history - Jesus Christ ❤ Jesus changed the face of the Earth by demonstrating unconditional love to everyone he met. He preached love, challenged religious authorities, performed countless miracles, and changed people's lives for the better ❤
John 15:12 'My Command is this: Love each other, as I have loved you'

Are We All God’s Children? #BlackenAsiaWithLove

Warning: This is prose is an original work of fiction about an aching and divided world. May we develop a culture that values the strength to love.

 

Somebody once tried to tell me that we were all God’s children,

That all people were born into His kingdom,

Flesh of His flesh,

And meant to reign over the Earth on His behalf, with His grace.

I never bought that crap.

 

If people believed in God, would they alter his garden so drastically, that the earth itself is fighting back for life?

How can we say we were put here by Him,

Only to treat this place like crap!?!

 

If people believed in God, then

Why do so many of us try to rework the image He gave us?

We prick, pull, peel, perm, slim down and slice up our bodies so dramatically, that

We’re often unrecognizable to ourselves.

If we were created in His image, why do we mutilate it so?

I never bought that crap.

 

If people really believed in God, then

Why do we give in so easily to jealousy,

Riding the coat-tails of others,

Admonishing those who do good, but

We’re still victims of what we consider to be as ‘perfect’.

You can’t be Woke in this word unless you’re Jesus,

And you see what happened to Him.

If Jesus Christ walked into the White House, The Vatican or #10 today,

They’d crucify Him all over again.

Did I mention today’s Easter Saturday…the one day between crucifixion and resurrection…

The one day when Jesus is truly dead…

Only the believers believe that he’ll come back.

But His followers today would be ready to make Him a martyr all over again…

Just to keep their story straight.

I never bought that crap.

WWJD Today?

Keep-calm-WWJD

If Jesus walked in here today,

I believe he’d be trying to heal the masses with some universal salve that cures all…

But drug companies saw their profits dive and so they crucified Him.

They were out for blood, and with the strength of their lobbying,

Blood is what they got.

 

 

 

If Jesus walked in here today,

I believe he’d feed the needy.

But conservatives would see their power draining,

Since they needed to demonize the poor as welfare losers.

Jesus was giving them a hand up, not a hand-out, and

Many had climbed out of poverty,

Too many climbed out to manipulate, so

They labelled Him a socialist.

Conservatives got together and decided to crucify Him.

 

If Jesus walked in here today,

I believe he’d rid us of WMD.

That includes guns!

Masses of people are killed by their own guns.

But Jesus wouldn’t want people going around gunning down wild animals for sport, either– Even to the point of extinction.

They called Jesus a tree-hugger because He brought up the near extinction of the North American bison in the same breath as

He gave the stank face to big-game hunters today.

Jesus said:

“Hanging the dead corpse of your kill on the wall was death worship,” and

Questioned if such people could call themselves Christian?

He was here to promote Life.

 

Jesus said anyone was a hypocrite for restricting access to birth control.

He accused those religious zealots of misusing His name in order to control women’s bodies and wealth through meds and policies.

Jesus promoted reproductive choices with the proceeds people always gave Him.

Jesus even invested in birth control for men, including

A pill, an injectable and a scrotum implant.

He claimed He was empowering men to be able to have that choice.

 

Worse still, Jesus was not only a carpenter, but an avid horticulturist…

He grew His own.

Everything.

And He had led pilgrimages through forests to hug trees.

He only hugged trees tapped for logging,

Jesus loved hugging trees so much he’d once got several thousand people to go down to the Amazon and chain themselves to the trees high up in the canopy.

He said forests were his Father’s first cities; who were we to tear them down?

Logging was sacrilege.

 

 

 

And as for this tree-hugging crap,

Jesus was a vegan, too.

He said He couldn’t hurt any of God’s creatures, and

Even though He didn’t suggest we all refrain from meat,

He used His YouTube channel to interview more humane animal farmers around the world.

(Oh yeah, there was also that time Jesus went to Davos – uninvited-

He weighed in on fair trade. Isolationists were none too pleased).

 

He even had vegan cosmetics lines.

He had interviews with His farmers, factory workers, warehousing, delivery, even retailers to show good working conditions and fair pay.

Because of this, consumers said His pricing was fair, and began campaigns to press the other major companies into transparency, too.

LVMH’s sales took nose dive, as did others.

Worse, still, He only marketed His vegan haircare brand, Glory Locks, through

Online tutorials for wooly hair.

His conditioner, Kinky Salvation, became a sensation in the natural hair care community, where

It was discovered that the formula also beat hair loss!

Jesus could regrow hair!

That year, GQ put Him on the cover as The Man of the Millennium.

He caused a bidding war between major cosmetics companies when He agreed to sell His patented mineral foundation, Holy Teint.

There were lines in stores when He released new compact motifs-

The blue dove and the red cross sold out within hours.

Reviews in Vogue, Bazaar, Cosmo and more all said His foundation matched coppery skin tones above all other brands.

His vegan cocoa butter, Divine Skin, had seen sales of Vaseline drop by 50%.

 

As a vegan,

He was most animate about respecting God’s plants enough not manipulate seed genes that can’t reproduce,

Just so farmers would have to buy more each season.

The giants of pesticides and seeds, beef, logging all got together to take Him down.

Big chicken, Big Fish and Big Pork all joined in the Jesus bashing, too,

For they knew he’d soon come for them.

He’d already posted a nasty comment on a viral video about an industrial chicken farm, for which Netflix had given Him a ten-part special called: Unholy Food, Inc.

He went all vegan, too!

Not even honey was safe,

And the episodes of palm oil and avocado saw those commodities’ stocks dive the day after each debut!

Now, that’s gangster!

Jesus was no joke!

 

 

 

 

At Michael Jackson’s funeral,

Jesus did an interpretive dance to the artist’s Will You Be There.

At the end of His performance, He suddenly grabbed the mic in tears and said:

“I love my Jackson 5 nostrils, and I believe if Michael had, too, he’d still be here.”

Katherine and Joe Jackson just hung their heads.

 

‘I love my Jackson 5 nostrils’ quickly became a meme and

Later incorporated into a pop song.

He was accused of being anti-white.

In an MTV interview about the controversial lyrics, He said:

“The clear message here is that…

What we consider beautiful too often has too little to do with our authentic selves.

We do the exact same to mother Earth,

Digging, prodding, cementing over and dirtying up the air and waters of My father’s kingdom.”

Jesus was deep.

 

He was an avid reader, too.

Jesus wept when He read the Letter from a Birmingham Jail.

When asked for comment He simply said:

“So few in My Father’s kingdom have the strength to love.”

 

For the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots,

Jesus accepted invitations to lead Pride parades all over the world.

People thought he’d had enough in New York, Chicago, Boston, LA and of course, San Fran.

But many were surprised when Jesus was on the first float at Black Gay Pride in Atlanta and DC!

None were shocked, then, when

Jesus showed up at London and Paris Pride and Christopher Street Day in Berlin.

But no one, and I mean no one,

Imagined for a second

That He’d dress up silly and

Dance with a gay Christian Carnival Crew at Cologne’s CSD Day!

When did He even have time to practice those moves?

Who knew He had such an angelic voice…

Until they heard His rendition of George Michael’s Jesus to a Child.

He brought everyone to tears that day in Heumarkt Square.

Plus, everybody loved the performance He did with Conchita Wurst of Beyoncé and Lady Gaga’s Telephone.

The two bearded men literally re-enacted the whole music video !

Who knew Conchita could do Gaga drag?

They popped-locked-n-rolled in spandex just like in the video.

Who knew Jesus had a black-boy-bubble-butt…

Like somebody cut a basketball in half and hung it off His tail bone.

Both videos went viral.

This was way too much for those in Africa who’d used His name to bash gay people.

They buckled down and passed anti-gay laws,

Nigeria making sure they out did Uganda.

They dismissed this Jesus as evidence of the decay in European values.

When He accepted the invitation to Pride in Cape Town and Nairobi…

Those in the region got ready.

Pride was canceled in Uganda.

Others roused lynch mobs from the pulpit.

They crucified Him all over again.

 

If Jesus walked in here today,

I believe he’d heal the disabled.

Jesus wouldn’t heal their conditions by some miracle of making a blind man see, a deaf man hear, or a crippled man walk.

Nah, nothing so simple.

Jesus removed what really hurts – fear and discrimination.

He targeted the stigma against disability.

No longer viewing different abilities as a liability,

Jesus undermined entire industries built around keeping them down.

 

Suddenly, office workers had to compete with the wheel-chair bound because,

Who needs to be able to walk into an office?

People had already seen how Autistic Savants could

Show us patterns in our lives that unfold life’s mysteries,

But Jesus showed the people how every person of every ability had something to contribute.

Charities for the poor fell because,

There were no more poor people – everyone had enough.

Politicians who’d been shoring-up votes by vilifying the Other as leachers could no longer galvanize their base around these fears.

The people eventually elected politicians who represented the people.

Somebody had to “take the country back, to make it great again,” so

Big Lobbying fought back.

Jesus had removed the control large corporations had over these politicians, so

They crucified Him.

 

Needless to say, because Jesus intervened,

There was universal healthcare that cared for the whole body – any body.

They resisted calling Him a socialist, but when Corona happened,

Everyone saw that unlike society, diseases don’t discriminate.

More of those who confessed to follow Him could see the sense in universal healthcare.

Insurance companies got together with Big Pharma and crucified Jesus for he’d taken away their monopoly.

Jesus exposed all their tricks, from

Inventing diseases to which only they had the cure, to

Hiding antidotes when they could instead sell us life-long supplies of meds that

Keep us just barely alive.

Jesus was fed up with humanity, but never gave up.

Jesus not only made room for the disabled, but

Made sure everyone got looked after.

He had to die.

He was much too good for this world.

It was clear to them that the only good Jesus was a dead Jesus –

The dead one they’d created in their holy books.

This resurrected one just wouldn’t do.

 

So, Jesus had gone too far.

War-mongers would vilify Him in the UN, and

Circumvent the authority of the world community, and

Wage a military campaign to track Him down.

For these war-mongers would charge Jesus with hoarding WMD.

They preferred the Iron Curtain to the Prince of Peace, so

They convincingly made the public scared of Him.

 

Big men wielding big sticks hunted Him down,

During a 40-day Vipassana retreat He’d taken in the Judean desert.

24-hour News spent months replaying drone and Body-Cam footage of His last moments,

Where their bullets crucified Him on the spot.

Just as they’d done for Osama Bin Laden,

Crowds of Christians gathered that night at the capitol to celebrate the blood-shedding.

They were death worshippers.

They even built a statue of Him on that spot to commemorate His sacrifice.

Crowds gathered there each Easter for festivities.

Hypocrites or just human?

At a time of a significant religious festival in the Christian calendar and at a time of global anxiety, sacrifice and distress, it seems apt to reflect on where we stand in it all.

Like most, I watch the television, listen to the radio, tap into social media (albeit only on limited occasions), receive emails and listen to family, friends and colleagues.

I am amazed by the sacrifice that some people make to protect or look after others and yet dismayed by the actions and comments of some.  And yet as I ponder on the current situation I realise that it only brings into focus behaviours, actions and comments that were already there.  Perhaps, the circumstances have allowed some to shine or provided more of a focus on those that already do outstanding things, and this is a good thing but human nature as it is, doesn’t really change. Here are a few examples, I’m sure if you reflect on these you will think of more.

  • We lament at the inequality in the world, but we do little about it.  Instead, we fight to buy up all the toilet rolls that we can, lest we run out.
  • We complain the government haven’t done enough in the current crisis and then flout the guidelines they gave us on social gatherings and movement or cause others to do so (did you really need that Amazon order?)
  • We complain about our work conditions, but we are content for the company or organisation to continue paying us, often saying they don’t pay us enough
  • We are upset by colleagues who do us a disservice and then denigrate others because of their so-called ineptitude
  • We complain about being bullied but go on to display the same bullying behaviours that we complained about
  • We call people misogynistic but then in the same breath suggest that the world would be better without men or that women do a better job
  • We accuse people of being racist but then use derogatory and stereotypical language to describe those that we accuse
  • We condemn those that we see as privileged and suggest they should give up their wealth and status. And yet we fail to consider our own privilege and are not prepared to give up what we have (see the first comment re inequality)
  • We see the criminal justice system as unfair but would be the first to complain if we were a victim of crime and the offender wasn’t brought to justice. What we see as justice is dependent on the impact the wrongful act has on us
  • We commit crimes, albeit perhaps minor ones or committed crimes when we were younger and didn’t know better, yet we castigate others for being criminal.  Welfare cheats are awful, but tax payments are to be avoided

I could go on, but I think by now you get the general idea. I’ll return to religion if I may, not that I’m religious, but I did start off the blog with an acknowledgement of the timing in line with the Christian calendar: “He that is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone at her”, (John, 8:7).  Maybe we should be a little more honest with ourselves and think about what we say or do before we judge and condemn others.  I do wonder though, are we all hypocrites, or is it part of the pathology of just  being human?

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